South African Vegetable Sowing Guide – July

July is a busy month in the ornamental garden and the food garden. It is time for pruning roses, fruit trees, vines and perennial herbs.

It also time for sowing the first spring vegetables and herbs.

In the summer rainfall areas, feed and water all winter vegetables at least once a week.

Regional Gardening Map

Table Notes:

Column 1 – Common Name

Column 2 – Type

Use this information to plan for a variety of herbs and vegetables. It can also be used for a basic crop rotation plan.

Column 3 – Nutrient Demand

This refers to how heavy a feeder the crop is. If you have poor soil, you should omit the high nutrient demand crops.

Low nutrient demand crops are capable of struggling along and will usually produce something edible even under poor conditions. Given soil more fertile than their minimum requirements they can become quite prolific.

Medium nutrient demand crops need significantly enriched soil to thrive. They will do a lot better when given soil considerably more fertile than their minimum requirements.

High nutrient demand crops will usually not thrive unless grown in light, loose, always moist soil that provides the highest level of nutrition.

Column 4 – Ease of Growing

Always choose crops that suit your experience level. Some crops are good teachers and they will prepare you for growing more difficult crops. Examples are herbs, Swiss chard, radishes and bush beans.

Columns 5 to 8 – Sowing Regions 1, 2, 3, 4 (See Map)

For food gardening purposes Southern Africa can be divided into four climatic regions. This is not an exact science. Use it as a guide only and keep good records to determine your own best sowing times. A “Y” indicates that you can sow the crop and a “N” obviously indicates that this is not a good month to sow the crop in your region.

You can sort the table with the arrows next to each column.

Help Your Fellow Food Gardeners

Use the comments to add your own food gardening experience to this table. Don’t forget to state your region and town.

NameTypeNutrient DemandEasy of Growing1234
Arugula (rocket)LeafMediumEasyYYYN
AsparagusLeafHighDifficultNYNN
BroccoliLeafHighVariableNNNN
Brussels SproutsLeafHighModerateNNNN
CabbageLeafMediumEasyYNNY
CauliflowerLeafHighDifficultNNNN
CeleryLeafHighDifficultYNNN
Cress and MustardLeafMediumModerateYYYY
KaleLeafLowEasyNNNN
Kohlrabi, leaf cropLeafLowEasyNNNN
Lettuce, leafLeafMediumModerateYNYY
MorogoLeafLowEasyYNYY
Oriental CabbagesLeafMediumEasyNNNN
RhubarbLeafMediumEasyYNYY
SpinachLeafMediumVariableYNYN
Swiss chardLeafLowEasyYYYN
BeetrootRootLowEasyYNYY
CarrotRootLowModerateYYYY
PotatoRootMediumEasyYNNY
RadishRootMediumEasyYYYY
Sweet potatoRootMediumEasyNNNY
TurnipsRootMediumModerateYNYY
Broad beansLegumeLowEasyNNNN
Bush beansLegumeLowEasyYYYN
Runner beansLegumeLowEasyYYYN
PeasLegumeLowEasyNNYY
Artichoke (globe)FruitMediumModerateNNNN
CucumberFruitMediumEasyYYNN
EggplantFruitMediumModerateYYYY
MealiesFruitMediumEasyYYYY
MelonsFruitMediumModerateYYNN
OkraFruitMediumModerateYYNY
Peppers, hotFruitMediumEasyYYNY
Peppers, sweetFruitHighEasyYYNY
PumpkinFruitMediumEasyYYNN
Squash, bushFruitMediumEasyYYYY
Squash, trailingFruitMediumEasyYYYY
TomatoesFruitMediumEasyYNYY
GarlicBulbMediumModerateNNNN
LeeksBulbHighDifficultNNNN
OnionsBulbHighDifficultNNNN
Spring onionsBulbMediumModerateYYYY
BasilHerbLowEasyNYNN
ChamomileHerbLowEasyNNNN
ChervilHerbLowEasyYYYY
ChivesHerbLowEasyYYNY
CorianderHerbLowEasyYYYY
DillHerbLowEasyYYNY
FennelHerbLowEasyYYNY
Garlic ChivesHerbLowEasyYYNY
LovageHerbLowEasyNNNN
MizunaLeafLowEasyYYYY
NasturtiumHerbLowEasyYYYY
Pak ChoiLeafLowEasyYYYY
ParsleyHerbLowEasyYYNY
RueHerbLowEasyYYNY
SageHerbLowEasyYYNY
SorrelHerbLowEasyYYNY

Comments

  1. Thanks DiDi
    One of the best things I have done is to do your online gardening course about 4 or 5 years ago. I am now setting up a community garden. This poses quite a few challenges in the new SA. Something you may want to look into at some stage. Or perhaps you are already doing it and I have missed it???

    • Hi Cilla. It’s great to hear from you. Best of luck with the community garden. We’ve been involved with some. Keep us posted on your progress.

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